denim-dictionary.jpg

 

Burr/Rivet


[bər; ˈrivit]
noun

The term rivet is commonly misused when referring to the metal hardware at the corners of jeans pockets. The part visible on the outside of the jeans is the “burr” – the rivet is the “nail” that pushes through from the inside.
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Chain Stitch


[CHān stiCH]
noun

The chain stitch is created when a threaded needle is pushed through one side of the fabric then pushed back through from the opposite side. This simple back-and-forth technique will create a loop on the underside of the fabric. This loop is the chain stitch.
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Crocking


[kräking]
verb

Crocking occurs when indigo dye transfers from fabric to another surface due to contact or rubbing.
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Crotch Blowout


[kroch bloh-out]
noun

A crotch blowout is a rip, tear or hole in the crotch area of your jeans, due to the amount of friction and tension that the fabric endures.
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Enzyme Wash


[ˈenzīm wôSH]
noun

Enzyme wash is a process that gives denim a softer and worn-in look by breaking down the cellulose molecules naturally found in indigo dyes.
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Felled Seam


[feld sēm]
noun

A felled seam is made by folding a raw edge of fabric underneath itself and then stitching the fold down. 
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Indigo Bleeding


[ˈindeˌɡō ˈblēdiNG]
noun

Indigo bleeding occurs when dye is transferred from the fabric to another surface and often happens with raw denim.
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Lockstitch


[ˈläkstiCH]
noun

A lockstitch is a sewing technique that locks the stitch in place. The top thread weaves into the bottom thread and the notch on the bottom turns to grab the top thread.
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Pre-Shrunk Denim


[prēˈSHreNGk den-uh m]
noun

Denim that has been pre-treated so that it will shrink less than 3% after being washed and dried. Also known as sanforization or sanforized denim.
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Projectile Looms


[preˈjekˌtīl lo͞oms]
noun

The projectile loom is one of the most commonly-used looms in modern denim manufacturing.
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Raw Denim


[ den-uh m]
noun

Raw denim, also known as “dry denim,” is denim in its purest form.
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Sandblasting


[ˈsan(d)ˌblasting]
noun

Sandblasting is a hazardous process used to give jeans a distressed and pre-worn look.
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Sanforized Denim


[san-fuh-rahyzed den-uh m]
noun

Sanforized denim is made from cloth that has been stretched, fixed and shrunk in length at the mill. This is done in order to reduce the amount of shrinkage that can happen after your jeans’ first wash. The result of sanforization leads to 1-3% shrinkage, as opposed to 10% shrinkage with unsanforized (shrink to fit) denim.
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Selvage/Selvedge Denim


[sel-vij den-uh m]
noun

The term selvage (or self-edge) describes a tightly woven band on the edge of fabric that has been finished in a way that prevents raveling. While modern weaving machines produce wide fabric where the weft (horizontal) yarn is cut on every pick (weft insertion), selvage from antique narrow shuttle looms is formed as the shuttle passes back and forth during weaving. Since the yarn is not cut, the selvage is tightly bound and forms a clean edge.

Selvage denim is created with fabric produced through the technique and shuttle looms described above, resulting in a crisp edge that can be seen when the jeans are cuffed.
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Shuttle Looms


[shuht-l loom]
noun

Shuttle looms are vintage weaving machines that were widely used prior to the 1960s before modern projectile looms were invented. Weaving on shuttle looms occur as the shuttle device carries the weft (horizontal) yarn across the loom while interlacing with the warp (vertical) yarn. As the shuttle continuously brings the weft yarn across the loom, the fabric is slowly created while forming finished edges. These finished edges give origin to the term “selvage” or “self-edge” denim.
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Soaking Denim


[ˈsōkiNG den-uh m]
verb

All denim is either sanforized (pre-shrunk) or unsanforized (in its raw cotton state). Soaking either type, if you choose to do it, has its benefits and can be an important step to undertake when starting a new pair of jeans.
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Stone Wash


[stōn wôSH]
noun

The process of stone washing involves placing denim into an industrial washer along with large stones.
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Straight Fit


[strāt fit]
noun

Straight fit denim is often referred to as regular fit denim. Straight fit denim sits fitted at the waist and has the same leg width from the thigh to the ankle.
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Tapered Fit


[ˈtāpered fit]
noun

The taper begins below the knee and narrows down to a bottom opening four inches smaller than classic straight leg jeans.
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Unsanforized Denim


[uhn-san-fuh-rahyzed den-uh m]
noun

Unsanforized denim, also known as “loomstate” or “shrink-to-fit” denim, is made from cloth that has not been through the sanforization process. In sanforization, the fabric is stretched, fixed and shrunk in length at the mill in order to reduce the amount of shrinkage that can occur after the first wash. Since unsanforized denim does not go through this process, it is expected to shrink up to 10% after the first soak.
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Warp and Weft


[wôrp, weft]
noun

Warp refers to the vertical lines on a woven cloth, while weft refers to the horizontal lines. To weave cloth, the warp is pulled tightly on the loom, creating vertical lines that guide the weft over and under.
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Whiskers


[ˈ(h)wiskers]
noun

Whiskers on jeans refers to the faded crease lines seen around the front pocket area of jeans.
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